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Young men in sports are at highest risk of acromioclavicular joint injuries: a prospective cohort study.

Authors
  • Skjaker, Stein Arve1
  • Enger, Martine2, 3
  • Engebretsen, Lars2, 3
  • Brox, Jens Ivar3, 4
  • Bøe, Berte2
  • 1 Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Nydalen, Pb 4950, 0424, Oslo, Norway. [email protected] , (Norway)
  • 2 Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Nydalen, Pb 4950, 0424, Oslo, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 3 Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 4 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. , (Norway)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2021
Volume
29
Issue
7
Pages
2039–2045
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00167-020-05958-x
PMID: 32270265
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To study the incidence of acromioclavicular joint injuries in a general population. All acute shoulder injuries admitted to an orthopaedic emergency department were registered prospectively, using electronic patient records and a patient-reported questionnaire. The regional area was the city of Oslo with 632,990 inhabitants. Patients with symptoms from the acromioclavicular joint without fracture were registered as a dislocation (type II-VI) if the radiologist described widening of the joint space or coracoclavicular distance on standard anteroposterior radiographs. Patients without such findings were diagnosed as sprains (type I). Acromioclavicular joint injuries constituted 11% of all shoulder injuries (287 of 2650). The incidence was 45 per 105 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI] 40-51). 196 (68%) were diagnosed as sprains and 91 (32%) as dislocations. Median age of all acromioclavicular joint injuries was 32 years (interquartile range 24-44), and 82% were men. Thirty percent of all acromioclavicular joint injuries were registered in men in their twenties. Sports injuries accounted for 53%, compared to 27% in other shoulder injuries [OR 3.1 (95% CI 2.4-4.0; p < 0.001)]. The most common sports associated with acromioclavicular joint injuries were football (24%), cycling (16%), martial arts (11%), alpine skiing and snowboarding (both 9%), and ice hockey (6%). Our study suggests that in the general population, one in ten shoulder injuries involves the acromioclavicular joint and young men in sports are at highest risk. A prognostic level II cohort study.

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