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Yeast cells contain a heterogeneous population of peroxisomes that segregate asymmetrically during cell division.

Authors
  • Kumar, Sanjeev1
  • de Boer, Rinse1
  • van der Klei, Ida J2
  • 1 Molecular Cell Biology, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 11103, 9700CC, Groningen, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 2 Molecular Cell Biology, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 11103, 9700CC, Groningen, The Netherlands [email protected] , (Netherlands)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Cell Science
Publisher
The Company of Biologists
Publication Date
Feb 07, 2018
Volume
131
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1242/jcs.207522
PMID: 29361529
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Here, we used fluorescence microscopy and a peroxisome-targeted tandem fluorescent protein timer to determine the relative age of peroxisomes in yeast. Our data indicate that yeast cells contain a heterogeneous population of relatively old and young peroxisomes. During budding, the peroxisome retention factor inheritance of peroxisomes protein 1 (Inp1) selectively associates to the older organelles, which are retained in the mother cells. Inp2, a protein required for transport of peroxisomes to the bud, preferentially associates to younger organelles. Using a microfluidics device, we demonstrate that the selective segregation of younger peroxisomes to the buds is carefully maintained during multiple budding events. The replicative lifespan of mother cells increased upon deletion of INP2, which resulted in the retention of all organelles in mother cells. These data suggest that, in wild-type yeast, transport of aged and deteriorated peroxisomes to the bud is prevented, whereas the young and vital organelles are preferably transported to the newly forming buds.

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