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Work-related medical rehabilitation in patients with cancer-Postrehabilitation results from a cluster-randomized multicenter trial.

Authors
  • Fauser, David1
  • Wienert, Julian2
  • Beinert, Thomas3
  • Schmielau, Jan4
  • Biester, Irene5
  • Krüger, Hans-Ulrich6
  • Presl, Angelika6
  • Bethge, Matthias1
  • 1 Institute for Social Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 2 Department of Psychology and Methods, Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 3 Department of Oncology, Paracelsus-Klinik am See, Bad Gandersheim, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 4 Department of Oncology, AMEOS Reha Klinikum, Ratzeburg, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 5 Department of Oncology, MediClin Rose Klinik, Horn-Bad Meinberg, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 6 Department of Oncology, Klinik Bavaria, Freyung, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2019
Volume
125
Issue
15
Pages
2666–2674
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/cncr.32131
PMID: 30985930
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Effective multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs supporting the return to work have become increasingly relevant for cancer survivors. In Germany, inpatient work-related medical rehabilitation programs consider treatment modules of work-related diagnostics, work-related functional capacity training, psychosocial groups, and intensified social counseling. The authors tested the effectiveness of a work-related medical rehabilitation program compared with conventional medical rehabilitation using a cluster-randomized multicenter trial (German Clinical Trial Register: DRKS00007770). In total, 484 patients with cancer were recruited at 4 rehabilitation centers. Patients at a center who started their rehabilitation in the same week represented a cluster. These clusters were randomly assigned using computer-generated randomization schedules either to an intervention group (IG) or to a control group (CG). The primary outcome was role functioning. Secondary outcomes were other quality-of-life domains and the return to work. In total, 425 patients (210 in the IG) were included in the analysis at the 3-month follow-up. There was no significant difference between the IG and CG in role functioning (b = 3.55; 95% CI, -1.18 to 8.29; P = .142). Participants in the IG reported better physical functioning (b = 5.99; 95% CI, 3.33-8.65; P < .001), less physical fatigue (b = -5.09; 95% CI, -9.62 to -0.56; P = .028), and less pain (b = -6.24; 95% CI, -11.24 to -1.23; P = .015). Work-related medical rehabilitation had no effect on the primary outcome compared with conventional medical rehabilitation but may enhance physical functioning and reduce physical fatigue and pain. © 2019 American Cancer Society.

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