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Working with a radical agenda: the Musasa project, Zimbabwe.

Authors
  • Stewart, S
Type
Published Article
Journal
Gender and development
Publication Date
Feb 01, 1995
Volume
3
Issue
1
Pages
30–35
Identifiers
PMID: 12159819
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

In 1988, a nongovernmental organization, the Musasa Project, was created to combat domestic violence against women in Zimbabwe where such violence is not only widespread, it is also socially acceptable. Therefore, Musasa not only set up shelters and provided counseling to victims of domestic violence, it also attempted to transform society through an extensive public education campaign. This campaign started with the police force through an identification of the problems police officers had experienced in their dealings with domestic violence. Discussions of these problems led to changes in the ways in which victims are interviewed. The police officers also reported difficulties interacting with the legal system which were addressed through a series of workshops facilitated by Musasa for members of the police force and of the legal system. Whereas these actions were both radical and innovative, the project's public statements were cautious during the first 3 years. Since the time of a planned change in leadership (when the original founders withdrew according to schedule), the project has grown increasingly radical and now addresses gender issues through a series of gender workshops designed to expose the workings of the patriarchy and the problems associated with lobola (the bride price).

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