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Work engagement, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions among family medicine residency program managers

Authors
  • Ofei-Dodoo, Samuel1
  • Long, Myra Chantel1
  • Bretches, Morgan1
  • Kruse, Bobbi J.2
  • Haynes, Cheryl3
  • Bachman, Caren4
  • 1 Family and Community Medicine, University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita, USA
  • 2 University of Minnesota Medical Center Family Medicine Residency Program, Minneapolis, USA
  • 3 The Southern Regional Area Health Education Center Family Medicine Residency, Fayetteville, NC, USA
  • 4 Smoky Hill Family Medicine Residency Program of the University of Kansas School of Medicine-Salina, USA
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Medical Education
Publisher
IJME
Publication Date
Feb 28, 2020
Volume
11
Pages
47–53
Identifiers
DOI: 10.5116/ijme.5e3e.7f16
PMID: 32114566
PMCID: PMC7246119
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Objectives The authors examined the associations between work engagement, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions among family medicine residency (FMR) managers. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of 511 FMR manager members of the Association of Family Medicine Administration using purposive sampling. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Job Satisfaction Survey, and Boshoff and Allen’s 3-item scale were used to assess work engagement, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions respectively. Descriptive statistics, Chi-Square tests, Pearson’s correlations, 2-way contingency table analysis, and hierarchical regression analyses were used to analyze the data. Results The response rate was 70.6% (389/551). Work engagement was positively correlated with job satisfaction (r[387]=.513, p<.001) and negatively correlated with turnover intentions (r[368]=.580, p<.001). Turnover intention was negatively correlated with job satisfaction (r[387]=-.690, p<.001). Positive assessment of nature of work (t[364]=15.06, p<.001), fringe benefits (t[364]=6.89, p<.001), communication (t[364]=2.27, p<.05), and promotion (t[364]=2.48, p<.05) predicted work engagement. Work engagement (t[364]=-4.31, p<.001), pay (t[364]=-3.71, p<.001), supervision (t[364]=-3.51, P<.01), contingent rewards (t[364]=-2.39, p<.05), nature of work (t[364]=-2.16, p<.05), and communication (t[364]=-2.15, p<.05) predicted turnover intentions. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate associations between work engagement, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions. When medical residency managers are emotionally and cognitively engaged at work, they tend to remain in the organization, validating and rewarding organizations that foster employee engagement. Further studies are needed to establish a causal relationship between work engagement, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions and to investigate other potential factors that could contribute to enriching the job satisfaction of this crucial group of professionals.

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