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Willingness to Take PrEP for HIV Prevention: The Combined Effects of Race/Ethnicity and Provider Trust.

Authors
  • Braksmajer, Amy1
  • Fedor, Theresa M2
  • Chen, Shaw-Ree3
  • Corales, Roberto3
  • Holt, Sally3
  • Valenti, William3
  • McMahon, James M1
  • 1 School of Nursing, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York.
  • 2 Department of Sociology, Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia. , (Colombia)
  • 3 Trillium Health, Rochester, New York.
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS education and prevention : official publication of the International Society for AIDS Education
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2018
Volume
30
Issue
1
Pages
1–12
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1521/aeap.2018.30.1.1
PMID: 29481300
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Blacks and Hispanics/Latinos are disproportionately burdened by HIV compared to non-Hispanic Whites, as evidenced by higher HIV incidence, prevalence, and deaths attributable to AIDS. Increasing the use of novel prevention techniques such as Truvada for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) could greatly help in reducing these disparities by lowering HIV incidence among these higher risk groups. Trust in providers, which may differ by race and ethnicity, may influence willingness to take PrEP. This study explores the moderating effect of race/ethnicity on trust in one's primary care provider (PCP) on PrEP willingness. This study found a significant association between PCP trust and PrEP willingness, with those with greater trust having 3.24 times the adjusted odds of being willing to try PrEP. Results regarding the effects of race and ethnicity on these outcomes, however, were inconclusive. Results indicate the importance of fostering trust between PrEP-prescribing PCPs and their patients.

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