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Why Vortex Lattice Melting Theory is Science Fiction

Authors
  • Nikulov, A. V.
Type
Preprint
Publication Date
Dec 25, 2003
Submission Date
Dec 25, 2003
Identifiers
arXiv ID: cond-mat/0312641
Source
arXiv
License
Unknown
External links

Abstract

Five years ago the talk "The vortex lattice melting theory as example of science fiction" cond-mat/9811051 was presented. Nevertheless this theory predominates up to now and very many people devote oneself to it. It is explained in the present paper why the only first order phase transition observed on the way from the Abrikosov state in the normal state should be interpreted as phase coherence disappearance. The false concept of vortex lattice melting appeared because of some causes main of them are erroneous interpretation of direct observation of the Abrikosov state and the use by theorists the habitual determination of phase coherence invalid for multi-connected superconducting state. The distinguished work by A.A. Abrikosov awarded of the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2003 predicted a periodic lattice structure with crystalline long-rang order only because that it is impossible to obtain any other result for the case of homogeneous, symmetric, infinite space. It is strange that most scientists have lightly admitted that this prediction corresponds to the facts. The long-rang order of superconducting state is phase coherence. Therefore if the Abrikosov state is also the vortex lattice then it have two long-rang orders and two phase transition may be expected. But only phase transition is assumed and observed always. History of this contradiction is considered in the present paper and it is analysed why some delusions about the Abrikosov state became popular. It is emphasized that taking into account thermal fluctuations changes in essence the habitual notion about the mixed state of type II superconductor built because of the Abrikosov result. First of all it shows that the Abrikosov solution is not valid just in the ideal case for which it was obtained.

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