Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Which Mothers Know That All Babies Cry? A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Child Abuse Prevention Program for Low-Income New Mothers.

Authors
  • Cala Cala, Luisa F1, 2, 3
  • Kelly, Carrie Leah1, 2
  • Ramos, Elaina1, 2
  • VanVleet, Marcia1, 3, 4
  • High, Pamela1, 2, 3
  • 1 Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.
  • 2 Hasbro Children's/Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USA.
  • 3 Women and Infants' Hospital, Providence, RI, USA.
  • 4 Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical Pediatrics
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
59
Issue
9-10
Pages
865–873
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0009922820922532
PMID: 32432487
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study evaluated an intervention for low-income new mothers, half from Spanish-speaking homes, that provides education around infant crying and abusive head trauma (AHT). At enrollment, non-US-born mothers were less likely than US-born mothers to have heard of shaken baby syndrome (60% vs 89%, P ≤ .0001) or to know shaking babies could lead to brain damage or death (48% vs 80%, P < .0001). At follow-up, non-US-born intervention mothers had improved knowledge of the peak of crying (31% vs 4%, P = .009), improved knowledge that shaking a baby could lead to brain damage or death (36% vs 12%, P = .035), and identified more calming strategies for parenting stress compared with non-US-born control mothers (+0.8 [SD = 1.1] vs -0.4 [SD = 1.4]). This study identifies a gap in AHT knowledge at baseline of non-US-born mothers. These mothers had improved knowledge with intervention and are an important population for similar prevention efforts.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times