Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

“When Is Health Care Actually Going to Be Care?” The Lived Experience of Family Planning Care Among Young Black Women

Authors
  • Logan, Rachel G.1
  • Daley, Ellen M.1
  • Vamos, Cheryl A.1
  • Louis-Jacques, Adetola1
  • Marhefka, Stephanie L.1
  • 1 University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
Type
Published Article
Journal
Qualitative Health Research
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Feb 23, 2021
Volume
31
Issue
6
Pages
1169–1182
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1049732321993094
PMID: 33622078
PMCID: PMC8114454
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Research Articles
License
Unknown

Abstract

While family planning care (FPC) visits may serve as opportunities to address gaps in knowledge and access to limited resources, young Black women may also face structural barriers (i.e., racism, discrimination, bias) to engaging in care due to the intersections of racial identity, age, and socioeconomic status. Findings from interviews with 22 Black women, ages 18 to 29 years, about the lived experience of FPC highlighted dynamic patient–provider encounters. Women’s narratives uncovered the following essences: silence around sex impedes engagement in care, patient–provider racial concordance as protection from harm, providers as a source of discouragement and misinformation, frustration as a normative experience, decision making excludes discussion and deliberation, medical mistrust is pervasive and a part of Black consciousness, and meaningful and empathic patient–provider encounters are elusive. Health systems should prioritize developing and enhancing young Black women’s relationship with FPC providers to help mitigate persistent inequities that perpetuate disadvantage among this population.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times