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What Are You Looking at? Joint Attention and Visual Perspective Taking in Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Authors
  • Warreyn, Petra1, 2
  • Roeyers, Herbert1
  • Oelbrandt, Tine1
  • De Groote, Isabel1
  • 1 Ghent University, Ghent, Research Group Developmental Disorders, Belgium
  • 2 Ghent University, Research Group Developmental Disorders, H. Dunantlaan 2, Ghent, B – 9000, Belgium , Ghent
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2005
Volume
17
Issue
1
Pages
55–73
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10882-005-2201-1
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
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Abstract

This study investigated joint attention and visual perspective taking abilities in young children. Twenty children with autism spectrum disorder in the age range of 3–7 years, and 20 age-matched control children participated in the study. Joint attention was assessed by a spontaneous gaze monitoring task, and two tasks measuring eye contact in ambiguous situations. Visual perspective taking was measured using a Level 1 task [(Flavell, J. H., 1978). Nebraska symposium on motivation, Vol. 25, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln]. The children with autism spectrum disorder were not only found to be impaired in their joint attention abilities, but they also showed problems on the visual perspective taking task. These results suggest that the basic dyadic person-object processes may develop in a slower and perhaps qualitatively different way in children with autism spectrum disorder.

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