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What You Believe Can Affect How You Feel: Anger Among Caregivers of Elderly People With Dementia.

Authors
  • Wang, Haoran1
  • Cui, Hongmei2
  • Wang, Meng2
  • Yang, Chunyan1
  • 1 Dalian Seventh People's Hospital, Dalian, China. , (China)
  • 2 Qindao Mental Health Center, Qingdao University, Qingdao, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Psychiatry
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2021
Volume
12
Pages
633730–633730
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyt.2021.633730
PMID: 33897493
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Background and Purpose: Anger has been recognized as a commonly experienced emotion among caregivers of elderly people with dementia. While several cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)-based intervening methods have been developed, limited research has systematically examined the associations between dementia-related cognition and caregiving anger. Currently, we focused on three representative and well-studied cognitive constructs, person-centered attitude (PCA), dementia representation (DR), and empathy, exploring how they related to caregiving anger. Methods & Results: In total, 327 caregivers (239 female) participated in the study and finished online questionnaires. Multi-variable regression analyzes showed that PCA (βPCA = -0.22**) and empathy (βempathy = -0.18**) could negatively predict caregiving anger. However, all DR dimensions had no influence on caregiving anger except coherence (βcoherence = -0.24**) in the current study. Conclusion: Generally, lower caregiving anger was associated with: (1) being more empathic; (2) having a person-centered attitude; and (3) having a comprehensive understanding of dementia. The results of this study provide detailed suggestions for the development of anger management programs for caregivers of people with dementia. Copyright © 2021 Wang, Cui, Wang and Yang.

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