Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

What Are PWDs (People With Diabetes) Doing Online? A Netnographic Analysis.

Authors
  • Tenderich, Amy1
  • Tenderich, Burghardt2
  • Barton, Tanner3
  • Richards, Sarah Elizabeth4
  • 1 1 TnT Initiatives LLC/DiabetesMine, Millbrae, CA, USA.
  • 2 2 USC Annenberg School of Communications and Journalism, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
  • 3 3 Ball State University, Muncie, IN, USA.
  • 4 4 Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2019
Volume
13
Issue
2
Pages
187–197
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1932296818813192
PMID: 30477335
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Social media have become a crucial channel for patient empowerment and peer support. New qualitative research underscores the fact that this "support" transcends mental health concerns, to actually provide patients with important practical tips and tricks for diabetes self-care, and product selection/decision-making information from peers. Netnography is an emerging methodology that applies an ethnographic research approach to studying activity on the social web. Researchers embed themselves in the online environment to take an observational "deep dive" into online conversations to identify themes, sentiments, and perceptions. Using this methodology in summer 2017, a team of researchers captured and analyzed hundreds of diabetes-related posts on prominent platforms Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest, Reddit, and Quora. Our team identified 6 major trends, or "life themes," in diabetes patient social media, providing insights into patient sentiments and needs. A topology of social media channels emerged, indicating which platforms are used most often for each life theme. Findings indicate that social media provides a significant source not only of moral support and camaraderie, but also critical education on thriving with diabetes. Importantly, we observed strong evidence of peer influence on patients' therapy and diabetes technology purchasing decisions.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times