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To what extent do paramedics apply safe handling principles when transferring patients from stair chairs to stretchers?

Authors
  • Larouche, Dominique1
  • Corbeil, Philippe1, 2
  • Bellemare, Marie3
  • Authier, Marie4
  • Prairie, Jérôme1
  • Hegg-Deloye, Sandrine1
  • 1 a Department of kinesiology, Faculty of medicine, Université Laval , Quebec City , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 b Centre for interdisciplinary research in rehabilitation and social integration (CIRRIS), Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux de la Capitale-Nationale (CIUSSS-CN) , Quebec City , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 3 c Department of industrial relations, Faculty of social sciences, Université Laval , Quebec City , Canada. , (Canada)
  • 4 d Consultant ergonomist , Montreal , QC , Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ergonomics
Publication Date
Jul 25, 2019
Pages
1–14
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/00140139.2019.1641629
PMID: 31282825
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The efficiency of training programmes in handling designed to prevent injuries has rarely been demonstrated by studies in the workplace. This study aimed to identify factors that may favour or inhibit the application of safe handling principles by paramedics performing full-body transfers of patients from a stair chair to a stretcher. In an observational field study, handling methods used in 45 patient transfers from a stair chair to stretcher were characterised. Principles concerning the physical environment seem to be applied frequently, but those applicable during the transfer are neglected. Principles taught during training may not be applied due to the physical constraints of the workplace and the underestimation of risk exposure. The results suggest that training should be enhanced, not by focussing on handling techniques but by focussing on compromise and the capacity to adapt work techniques based on the working context and the team-mate.

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