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Weathering the Storm: Psychological Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Clinical and Nonclinical Healthcare Workers in India

Authors
  • Sunil, Ravindranath1
  • Bhatt, Margiben T1
  • Bhumika, Tumkur Venkatesh2
  • Thomas, Nitha3
  • Puranik, Amitha4
  • Chaudhuri, Souvik1
  • Shwethapriya, Rao1
  • 1 Department of Critical Care Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India
  • 2 Department of Health Informatics, Prasanna School of Public Health, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India
  • 3 Department of Clinical Psychology, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India
  • 4 Department of Data-sciences, Prasanna School of Public Health, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India
Type
Published Article
Journal
Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine : Peer-reviewed, Official Publication of Indian Society of Critical Care Medicine
Publisher
Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2021
Volume
25
Issue
1
Pages
16–20
Identifiers
DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10071-23702
PMID: 33603296
PMCID: PMC7874280
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Background Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has exposed healthcare workers (HCWs) to a unique set of challenges and stressors. Our frontline workers are under tremendous psychological pressure because of the ever-rising crisis. This study was done to assess the magnitude of the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinical and nonclinical HCWs in India. Materials and methods It was a cross-sectional, online survey that was done from June 1, 2020, to July 4, 2020. A total of 313 clinical and nonclinical HCWs, who were directly or indirectly involved in patient care, participated in the study. The psychological impact was assessed in terms of four variables: insomnia, anxiety, depression, and stress. Insomnia was assessed by the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Anxiety and depression were assessed via the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4), which included a 2-item anxiety scale and a 2-item depression scale (PHQ-2). Stress was assessed via the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). We also compared the psychological impact of this pandemic between clinical and nonclinical HCWs. Results 7.3% of HCWs were having moderate insomnia, 3.8% had severe insomnia, and 20.8% were having subthreshold insomnia. Severe anxiety and depression were found in 6.7% of respondents. 8.0 and 32.3% of the respondents had moderate and mild anxiety–depression, respectively. 6.4% had high perceived stress. 47.6 and 46.0% of the respondents had moderate and low stress, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in severe insomnia between clinical and nonclinical HCWs, whereas no significant difference in anxiety, depression, and stress between clinical and nonclinical HCWs. Conclusion This study suggests that psychological morbidity is prevalent among both clinical and nonclinical HCWs and both males and females. Early intervention may be beneficial to prevent this issue. How to cite this article Sunil R, Bhatt MT, Bhumika TV, Thomas N, Puranik A, Chaudhuri S, et al. Weathering the Storm: Psychological Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Clinical and Nonclinical Healthcare Workers in India. Indian J Crit Care Med 2021;25(1):16–20.

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