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Wealth- and education-related inequalities in minimum dietary diversity among Indonesian infants and young children: a decomposition analysis.

Authors
  • Paramashanti, Bunga A1, 2
  • Dibley, Michael J1
  • Alam, Ashraful1
  • Huda, Tanvir M1
  • 1 Sydney School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universitas Alma Ata, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. , (Indonesia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Global Health Action
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Dec 31, 2022
Volume
15
Issue
1
Pages
2040152–2040152
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/16549716.2022.2040152
PMID: 35389332
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Over the last two decades, Indonesia has experienced remarkable economic growth. However, the percentage of infants and young children meeting the minimum dietary diversity (MDD) criteria has stagnated. Despite the growing body of evidence of the association between MDD and socioeconomic factors, there is little information about socioeconomic inequalities in MDD in Indonesia. The current study seeks to quantify the wealth- and education-related inequalities in MDD among infants and young children in Indonesia and determine the contribution of different factors to these disparities. We included a total of 5038 children aged 6-23 months of the 2017 Indonesia Demographic and Health Survey. We measured wealth- and education-related inequalities using the concentration curve and Wagstaff normalised concentration index. Using a concentration index decomposition analysis, we then examined factors contributing to wealth- and education-related inequalities in MDD. The concentration indices by household wealth and maternal education were 0.220 (p < 0.001) and 0.192 (p < 0.001), respectively, indicating more concentration of inequalities among the advantaged population. The decomposition analysis revealed that household wealth (29.8%), antenatal care (ANC) visits (16.6%), paternal occupation (15.1%), and maternal education (11.8%) explained the pro-rich inequalities in MDD in Indonesia. Maternal education (26.1%), household wealth (19.1%), ANC visits (14.9%), and paternal occupation (10.9%) made the most considerable contribution to education-related inequalities in MDD. There is substantial wealth- and education-related inequalities in MDD. Our findings suggest an urgent need to address the underlying causes of not reaching dietary diversity by promoting infant and young child feeding equity in Indonesia.

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