Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

'We need other men to stand up and start the journey' engaging men as HIV community health workers - a gender transformative approach?

Authors
  • Gittings, Lesley1, 2
  • Grimwood, Ashraf3
  • 1 AIDS and Society Research Unit, Centre for Social Science Research, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. , (South Africa)
  • 2 School of Public Health and Family Medicine, Division of Social and Behavioural Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. , (South Africa)
  • 3 Kheth'Impilo AIDS Free Living, Cape Town, South Africa. , (South Africa)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Culture, health & sexuality
Publication Date
Mar 05, 2020
Pages
1–15
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/13691058.2019.1700306
PMID: 32133938
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The HIV epidemic is strongly gendered. Women and girls are more likely to contract HIV for biological and social reasons in Sub-Saharan Africa and men living with HIV are more likely to be lost to follow-up and die on antiretroviral therapy (ART) than women. Care work is also gendered, with women shouldering the burden of HIV care-related work. This paper considers the potential of male delivered community health work to improve men's HIV-related health outcomes and shift gendered norms related to care work. It describes the experiences and perspectives of eight HIV community health workers and their clients from the Cape Town area, and reviews current evidence on male-focused HIV and sexual and reproductive health services, gender transformation and men and care. Findings suggest that meaningfully involving more men in HIV care work may be a way to shift damaging hegemonic masculine norms related to care and health, and that South Africa's roll-out of National Health Insurance could be an opportunity to do so. Barriers to engaging men in this feminised profession are also explored.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times