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Are we ignoring coexisting rhabdomyolysis as an important aggravating factor for acute kidney injury among childhood diabetic ketoacidosis?

Authors
  • Giri, Prabhas. P1
  • Akhtar, Shakil1
  • Laha, Somrita1
  • Sinha, Rajiv1
  • 1 Institute of Child Health, India , (India)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism
Publisher
Walter de Gruyter GmbH
Publication Date
Oct 07, 2020
Volume
34
Issue
2
Pages
251–254
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1515/jpem-2020-0251
Source
De Gruyter
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

ObjectivesAlthough Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) has been described among childhood diabetes ketocidosis (cDKA) there is scarcity of literature on the role of concomitant rhabdomyolysis.MethodA retrospective chart review was undertaken (2014–2018) to identify cDKA who developed AKI and had evidence of rhabdomyolysis defined by serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) > 5 times upper limit of normal.Result46 cDKA were identified. Ten (22%) developed AKI with 6/10 reaching peak AKI Stage 3 and 8/10 had co-current rhabdomyolysis. In comparison to non rhabdomyolysis group, cDKA with rhabdomyolysis were at presentation significantly more likely to be hypotensive and have higher corrected sodium and calculated osmolality. Subsequently they were more likely to develop lower trough potassium levels during treatment. Five patients, all with rhabdomyolysis, needed dialysis: median duration 9 days (range 4–35). Three children in our cohort died, all from infection complications during treatment, one in AKI only group who did not receive dialysis and two in AKI with rhabdomyolysis on dialysis.ConclusionRhabdomyolysis was common among our cohort of cDKA with AKI and was associated with high morbidity and mortality. Rapid flux in electrolytes and osmolality may be important precipitating factors. We recommend larger prospective studies exploring the importance of rhabdomyolysis among cDKA with AKI.

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