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In vivo and in vitro characteristics of interleukin 6-transfected B16 melanoma cells.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer research
Publication Date
Volume
52
Issue
19
Pages
5412–5415
Identifiers
PMID: 1394147
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a multifunctional cytokine important in the inflammatory response. Its potential role as an antitumor agent has been suggested by its demonstrated activity in a variety of tumor models. The mechanism of antitumor activity has been proposed to be its enhancement of cytotoxic T-cell function. In the current work we demonstrate clear antitumor activity for this cytokine in a nonimmunogenic tumor system. B16 melanoma cells transfected with the human IL-6 complementary DNA demonstrated slower tumor growth in vivo. Tumors that developed from these cells had a prominent stromal matrix, an easily recognized infiltration of inflammatory cells, fewer mitotic figures, and fewer blood vessels. These in vivo findings corresponded with a greater adhesion of the IL-6-transfected B16 cells to stromal matrix proteins (laminin, fibronectin, and vitronectin) and a less prominent vascular response in an intradermal angiogenesis assay. Therefore, we propose that with weakly antigenic tumors, such as B16 melanoma, IL-6 may mediate important antitumor responses by nonspecific proinflammatory mechanisms.

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