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In vitro cytotoxicity of chrysotile asbestos to human pulmonary alveolar macrophages is decreased by organosilane coating and surfactant.

Authors
  • Morrison, D G
  • McLemore, T L
  • Lawrence, E C
  • Feuerbacher, D G
  • Mace, M L Jr
  • Busbee, D L
  • Griffin, A C
  • Marshall, M V
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cell biology and toxicology
Publication Date
Jun 01, 1986
Volume
2
Issue
2
Pages
293–309
Identifiers
PMID: 2855798
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Human pulmonary alveolar macrophages were used to quantitate the cytotoxic effect of surface-altered chrysotile asbestos. Little difference was observed in mortality between chrysotile asbestos that was surface-treated to a 42% extent by a hydrophobic organosilane or untreated chrysotile. Little or no effect on mortality was observed when human pulmonary alveolar macrophages were cultured with untreated chrysotile or acid-leached asbestos in the presence of 10 mM dipalmitoyl lecithin. However, when human pulmonary alveolar macrophages were cultured with a hydrophobically-treated (to a 42% or 95% extent) chrysotile asbestos in the presence of 10 mM dipalmitoyl lecithin, a statistically significant decrease in mortality was observed compared to untreated chrysotile. No mutagenic activity was observed when V79 cells were cultured with acid-leached, or 42% hydrophobically-treated chrysotile asbestos, even when human pulmonary alveolar macrophages were included as an activation source. The 95% hydrophobically-treated and acid-leached chrysotile also exhibited decreased binding of benzo[a]pyrene compared to untreated chrysotile asbestos.

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