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Vitamin D Deficient Older Adults Are More Prone to Have Metabolic Syndrome, but Not to a Greater Number of Metabolic Syndrome Parameters

Authors
  • Pott-Junior, Henrique1
  • Nascimento, Carla Manuela Crispim2
  • Costa-Guarisco, Letícia Pimenta2
  • Gomes, Grace Angelica de Oliveira2
  • Gramani-Say, Karina2
  • Orlandi, Fabiana de Souza2
  • Gratão, Aline Cristina Martins2
  • Orlandi, Ariene Angelini dos Santos
  • Pavarini, Sofia Cristina Iost2
  • Vasilceac, Fernando Augusto2
  • Zazzetta, Marisa Silvana2
  • Cominetti, Marcia Regina2
  • 1 Department of Medicine, Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar), São Carlos 13565-905, Brazil
  • 2 (M.S.Z.)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nutrients
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Mar 12, 2020
Volume
12
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/nu12030748
PMID: 32178228
PMCID: PMC7146307
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between metabolic parameters and low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in older adults (n = 265). They were assessed for anthropometrics and metabolic measurements, including 25(OH)D, insulin, glucose, total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG) and other inflammatory markers. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as a 25(OH)D level below 50 nmol/L. Comparisons between groups were performed using Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney or Pearson’s Chi-squared test. A multivariate adjusted Poisson regression was used to model the number of metabolic parameters as a function of a set of explanatory variables. Subjects with 25(OH)D deficiency were predominantly females and presented higher body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, triglycerides and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), and higher insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome was also more prevalent among 25(OH)D-deficient subjects. In those without metabolic syndrome, 25(OH)D deficiency was related only to obesity and higher insulin resistance. Female sex, hypertension, higher waist circumference and higher levels of hemoglobin A1C (%), HDL-C, and TG were significantly associated with an increased number of metabolic syndrome parameters after adjusting for covariates, but 25(OH)D was not. The fact that serum 25(OH)D concentration was inversely associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance not only reaffirms the relevance to consider serum 25(OH)D concentration as an influencing factor for insulin resistance, but also the need to actively screen for hypovitaminosis D in all patients with this condition.

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