Affordable Access

Visual function: the problem with eccentricity.

Authors
  • Battista, Josephine
  • Kalloniatis, Michael
  • Metha, Andrew
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical & experimental optometry
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2005
Volume
88
Issue
5
Pages
313–321
Identifiers
PMID: 16255690
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries. With an ageing population, the prevalence of such a condition has resulted in a large proportion of the population relying on peripheral vision to undertake activities of daily living. Peripheral vision is not a scaled-down version of the fovea, simply requiring larger print or increased contrast for detection of objects or reading text. Even when print size is scaled and eye movements are minimised, the peripheral retina cannot perform at the level of the foveal region. Understanding how and why reading performance is limited as a function of eccentricity has important implications for how we approach rehabilitation of patients with central visual loss. This brief review of the extensive literature on reading with peripheral vision and the research aimed at better reading rehabilitation for low vision patients focuses on why many of the problems associated with the reduced reading capability of peripheral vision cannot be completely solved with magnification, reducing eye movements or modifying print.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times