Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Visual Disengagement: Genetic Architecture and Relation to Autistic Traits in the General Population.

Authors
  • Siqueiros Sanchez, Monica1, 2
  • Pettersson, Erik3
  • Kennedy, Daniel P4
  • Bölte, Sven1, 2, 5
  • Lichtenstein, Paul3
  • D'Onofrio, Brian M3, 4
  • Falck-Ytter, Terje6, 7, 8, 9
  • 1 Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, 113 30, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 2 Center of Psychiatry Research, Stockholm County Council, 113 64, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 3 Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, 171 65, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 4 Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA. , (India)
  • 5 Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm County Council, 113 30, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 6 Center of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (KIND), Division of Neuropsychiatry, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, 113 30, Stockholm, Sweden. [email protected] , (Sweden)
  • 7 Center of Psychiatry Research, Stockholm County Council, 113 64, Stockholm, Sweden. [email protected] , (Sweden)
  • 8 Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, 751 42, Uppsala, Sweden. [email protected] , (Sweden)
  • 9 Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS), Uppsala, 752 38, Sweden. [email protected] , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2020
Volume
50
Issue
6
Pages
2188–2200
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10803-019-03974-6
PMID: 30859356
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Visual disengagement has been hypothesized as an endophenotype for autism. In this study we used twin modelling to assess the role of genetics in basic measures of visual disengagement, and tested their putative association to autistic traits in the general population. We used the Gap Overlap task in a sample of 492 twins. Results showed that most of the covariance among eye movement latencies across conditions was shared and primarily genetic. Further, there were unique genetic contributions to the Gap condition, but not to the Overlap condition-i.e. the one theorized to capture visual disengagement. We found no phenotypic association between autistic traits and disengagement, thus not supporting the hypothesis of visual disengagement as an endophenotype for autistic traits.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times