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Viscosity and thermal kinetics of 10 preheated restorative resin composites and effect of ultrasound energy on film thickness.

Authors
  • Marcondes, Rogério L1
  • Lima, Verônica P1
  • Barbon, Fabíola J1
  • Isolan, Cristina P1
  • Carvalho, Marco A2
  • Salvador, Marcos V3
  • Lima, Adriano F3
  • Moraes, Rafael R4
  • 1 Graduate Program in Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 2 Graduate Program in Dentistry, Anápolis University Center (Unievangélica), Anápolis, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 3 Dental Research Division, Paulista University (UNIP), São Paulo, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 4 Graduate Program in Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Brazil)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Dental materials : official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
36
Issue
10
Pages
1356–1364
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.dental.2020.08.004
PMID: 32888725
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study investigated viscosity and thermal kinetics of 10 selected preheated restorative resin composites and the effect of ultrasound energy on film thickness. A range of different resin composites was tested: Charisma Diamond, IPS Empress Direct, Enamel Plus HRi, Essentia, Estelite Omega, Filtek Z100, Filtek Z350 XT, Gradia, TPH Spectrum and VisCalor. A flowable resin composite (Opallis Flow) and two resin cements (RelyX Veneer, Variolink Esthetic LC) also were tested. Viscosity (Pa s) was measured at 37 °C and 69 °C (preheating temperature) using a rheometer. Film thickness (μm) was measured before and after application of ultrasound energy. Temperature loss within resin composite following preheating (°C/s) was monitored. Data were statistically analyzed (α = 0.05). Viscosity at 69 °C was lower than at 37 °C for all materials except the flowable resin composite. Preheating reduced viscosity between 47% and 92% for the restorative resin composites, which were generally more viscous than the flowable materials. Film thickness varied largely among materials. All preheated resin composites had films thicker than 50 μm without ultrasound energy. Application of ultrasound reduced film thickness between 21% and 49%. Linear and nonlinear regressions did not identify any relationship between filler loading, viscosity, and/or film thickness. All materials showed quick temperature reduction following preheating, showing maximum temperature loss rates after approximately 10 s. Distinct restorative resin composites react differently to preheating, affecting viscosity and film thickness. The overall performance of the preheating technique depends on proper material selection and use of ultrasound energy for reducing film thickness. Copyright © 2020 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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