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Viral co-infections among SARS-CoV-2-infected children and infected adult household contacts

Authors
  • Pigny, Fiona1
  • Wagner, Noémie1
  • Rohr, Marie1
  • Mamin, Aline1
  • Cherpillod, Pascal1
  • Posfay-Barbe, Klara M.1
  • Kaiser, Laurent1
  • Eckerle, Isabella1
  • L’Huillier, Arnaud G.1, 1
  • Gervaix, Alain
  • Lacroix, Laurence
  • Haddad, Kevin
  • Posfay-Barbe, Klara M.
  • Wagner, Noemie
  • L’Huillier, Arnaud G.
  • Pinosch, Selina
  • Grazioli, Serge
  • Pfister, Riccardo
  • Widlhaber, Barbara
  • Beghetti, Maurice
  • And 1 more
  • 1 Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine,
Type
Published Article
Journal
European Journal of Pediatrics
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jan 27, 2021
Volume
180
Issue
6
Pages
1991–1995
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00431-021-03947-x
PMID: 33502627
PMCID: PMC7838463
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Short Communication
License
Unknown

Abstract

We evaluated the rates of viral respiratory co-infections among SARS-CoV-2-infected children. Twelve percent of SARS-CoV-2-infected children had viral co-infection with one or more common respiratory viruses. This was significantly more frequent than among their SARS-CoV-2-infected adult household contacts (0%; p =0.028). Compared to the same period the previous year, common respiratory viruses were less frequently detected (12% vs 73%, p <0.001). Conclusion : Despite partial lockdown with school and daycare closure, and consequently similar exposure to common viruses between children and adults, SARS-CoV-2-infected children had more frequent viral respiratory co-infections than their SARS-CoV-2-infected adult household contacts. Circulation of common respiratory viruses was less frequent during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak when compared to the same period last year, showing the impact of partial lockdown on the circulation of common viruses. What is Known: • Viral respiratory co-infections are frequent in children. • SARS-CoV-2 can be identified alongside other respiratory viruses, but data comparing children and adults are lacking. What is New: • Children infected with SARS-CoV-2 are more likely to have viral respiratory co-infections than their SARS-CoV-2-infected adult household contacts, which is surprising in the context of partial lockdown with schools and daycare closed. • When compared to data collected during the same period last year, our study also showed that partial lockdown reduced circulation of common respiratory viruses.

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