Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Victimization by Friends and Victimization by Other Peers: Common Risk Factors or Mutual Influence?

Authors
  • Vucetic, Mirjana1
  • Brendgen, Mara2, 3
  • Vitaro, Frank4, 5
  • Dionne, Ginette6
  • Boivin, Michel6
  • 1 Department of Psychology, University of Quebec at Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Department of Psychology, University of Quebec at Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada. [email protected] , (Canada)
  • 3 Ste-Justine Hospital Research Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada. [email protected] , (Canada)
  • 4 Ste-Justine Hospital Research Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 5 School of Psycho-Education, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 6 School of Psychology, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Youth and Adolescence
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2021
Volume
50
Issue
3
Pages
563–578
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10964-020-01270-6
PMID: 32562112
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Much research effort has been placed on understanding peer victimization. However, few studies have focused on victimization within friendships, which affects up to half of adolescents and bears similar consequences as victimization by the larger peer group. This study examined the temporal stability and the risk factors of victimization within friendships and victimization by other peers. In regard to the first objective, moderate to high levels of stability over a one-year period were expected for victimization by friends and by other peers. In regard to the second objective, two - not necessarily mutual exclusive - hypotheses were tested. The Common Risk Factors Hypothesis postulated that victimization by friends and by other peers share common personal and familial risk factors. Alternatively, the Mutual Influence Hypothesis proposed that victimization within one relationship context may increase the risk of being victimized in the other relationship context. These hypotheses were tested with a sample of 878 adolescents (Mage = 15.08 years, range 14.50-15.75; 52% female) assessed in Grades 8 and 9. Structural equation modeling revealed moderate and weak one-year stability for victimization by friends and by other peers, respectively. No common risk factors emerged, but victimization within one relationship context increased the risk of victimization in the other relationship context one year later. These results are in line with the mutual influence hypothesis and provide evidence of a cross-context transfer of victimization in adolescence.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times