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Verbal victimisation, depressive symptoms, and suicide risk among sexual minority adults in France: results from the nationally-representative 2017 Health Barometer survey.

Authors
  • El-Khoury, Fabienne1
  • Heron, Mégane2
  • Van der Waerden, Judith2
  • Leon, Christophe3
  • du Roscoat, Enguerrand3
  • Velter, Annie3
  • Lydié, Nathalie3
  • Sitbon, Audrey3
  • 1 Sorbonne Université, INSERM, Institut Pierre Louis D'Épidémiologie Et de Santé Publique, IPLESP, ERES, 75012, Paris, France. [email protected] , (France)
  • 2 Sorbonne Université, INSERM, Institut Pierre Louis D'Épidémiologie Et de Santé Publique, IPLESP, ERES, 75012, Paris, France. , (France)
  • 3 Santé Publique France, French National Public Health Agency, Saint-Maurice, France. , (France)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2020
Volume
55
Issue
8
Pages
1073–1080
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00127-020-01848-2
PMID: 32055898
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Our study estimates rates of depressive symptoms and suicide risk according to sexual minority status, and examines the mediating effect of verbal victimisation in the association between sexual minority status and mental health outcomes. Analysis is based on data from the 2017 French Health Barometer, a general population phone survey, which recruited 25,198 adults aged 18-75 years. Data were weighted to be representative of the French adult population. Four mental health outcomes occurring in the preceding year or currently were examined in relation to sexual minority status using multivariate logistic regressions: (a) current depressive symptoms, (b) having experienced a major depressive episode, (c) suicidal ideation, and (d) suicide attempt. Further we conducted mediation analyses to evaluate the contribution that verbal victimisation experienced in the preceding year has in the association between sexual minority status and the listed outcomes. All analyses were also stratified by sex. Sexual minority adults were more likely to experience verbal victimisation in the last year compared to heterosexual individuals (22% vs 11.4%). They were also more likely to have experienced each of the four mental health outcomes, even after adjusting for potential confounders. In adjusted mediation analysis, verbal victimisation in the preceding year was found to significantly mediate the association between sexual orientation and mental health outcome with mediated proportions varying between 15 and 22%. Sexual minority individuals are more at risk of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation compared to heterosexuals, and this may be partially mediated by verbal victimisation.

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