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Varying the message source in computer-tailored nutrition education.

Authors
  • Campbell, M K
  • Bernhardt, J M
  • Waldmiller, M
  • Jackson, B
  • Potenziani, D
  • Weathers, B
  • Demissie, S
Type
Published Article
Journal
Patient education and counseling
Publication Date
Feb 01, 1999
Volume
36
Issue
2
Pages
157–169
Identifiers
PMID: 10223020
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The effect of message source on message recall and perceived credibility was examined in a randomized study comparing two different computer-tailored bulletins promoting fruit and vegetable consumption among rural African American church members. An expert oriented (EXP) bulletin was compared with a spiritual and pastor-oriented (SPIR) bulletin and a control group. Both bulletins had the same format and used an identical set of dietary and psychosocial variables for tailoring. At follow-up, the majority of both intervention groups recalled receiving the bulletin, however message trust was higher in the SPIR group (P < 0.05). The EXP group reported higher trust of health and nutrition information coming from scientific research (P < 0.01), and the SPIR group reported higher trust of information coming from the pastor (P < 0.05). Both bulletin groups increased fruit and vegetable consumption significantly compared to the control group; however, this difference could not be solely attributed to the tailored intervention which was part of a multi-component program.

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