Affordable Access

Access to the full text

The Various Oximetric Techniques Used for the Evaluation of Blood Oxygenation

Authors
  • Nitzan, Meir
  • Nitzan, Itamar1
  • Arieli, Yoel
  • 1 Department of Neonatology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Shmuel Bait St 12, Jerusalem 9103102, Israel
Type
Published Article
Journal
Sensors
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Aug 27, 2020
Volume
20
Issue
17
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/s20174844
PMID: 32867184
PMCID: PMC7506757
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Review
License
Green

Abstract

Adequate oxygen delivery to a tissue depends on sufficient oxygen content in arterial blood and blood flow to the tissue. Oximetry is a technique for the assessment of blood oxygenation by measurements of light transmission through the blood, which is based on the different absorption spectra of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin. Oxygen saturation in arterial blood provides information on the adequacy of respiration and is routinely measured in clinical settings, utilizing pulse oximetry. Oxygen saturation, in venous blood (SvO2) and in the entire blood in a tissue (StO2), is related to the blood supply to the tissue, and several oximetric techniques have been developed for their assessment. SvO2 can be measured non-invasively in the fingers, making use of modified pulse oximetry, and in the retina, using the modified Beer–Lambert Law. StO2 is measured in peripheral muscle and cerebral tissue by means of various modes of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), utilizing the relative transparency of infrared light in muscle and cerebral tissue. The primary problem of oximetry is the discrimination between absorption by hemoglobin and scattering by tissue elements in the attenuation measurement, and the various techniques developed for isolating the absorption effect are presented in the current review, with their limitations.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times