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Variations in Emotional, Sexual, and Physical Intimate Partner Violence Among Women in Uganda: A Multilevel Analysis.

Authors
  • Amegbor, Prince M1
  • Pascoe, Laura2
  • 1 Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Bedroom Feminist Birth Doula Services, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of interpersonal violence
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2021
Volume
36
Issue
15-16
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0886260519839429
PMID: 30924708
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Evidence shows that a significant proportion of ever-partnered women suffer some form of intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetuated by male partners. The prevalence of IPV in sub-Saharan African countries is considerably higher than global estimates. Although existing studies show the effect of women's and intimate male partner's characteristics on IPV, knowledge on how these factors increase or reduce women's risk to specific types of IPV is limited. Using the 2016 Ugandan Demographic and Health Survey (UDHS), we examine regional variations in women's and intimate male partner's characteristics and their effect on emotional, sexual, and physical violence perpetuated by men and experienced by women in Uganda. The result shows that women's educational status is a significant predictor of all forms of IPV, whereas other characteristics, such as employment and housing ownership, have differential effects on specific types of IPV. Less educated women were more likely to experience emotional, sexual, and physical violence. Alcohol abuse was a significant determinant of men perpetuating all types of IPV; other male characteristics had differential effects on specific types of IPV. Male partners who abuse alcohol "often" and "sometimes" were more likely to commit acts of emotional, sexual, and physical violence against their female intimate partners. The findings also show that ~5%, ~8%, and ~2% of the variance in emotional, sexual, and physical violence (respectively; in the final models) are attributable to regional differences. The findings suggest the need for interventions aimed at increasing women's access to higher education, working with men and boys to reduce the occurrence of alcohol abuse and address harmful constructions of masculinity, and promoting gender equality among men as well as women.

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