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Variations in bitter-taste receptor genes, dietary intake, and colorectal adenoma risk.

Authors
  • Schembre, Susan M
  • Cheng, Iona
  • Wilkens, Lynne R
  • Albright, Cheryl L
  • Marchand, Le Loïc
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nutrition and Cancer
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2013
Volume
65
Issue
7
Pages
982–990
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/01635581.2013.807934
PMID: 24083639
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Genetic variants in bitter-taste receptor genes have been hypothesized to negatively impact health outcomes and/or influence dietary intake and, consequently, could increase the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Using a case-control study of 914 colorectal adenoma cases/1188 controls, we explored associations among colorectal adenoma risk, dietary intake, and genetic variation in 3 bitter-taste receptor genes: TAS2R38 (rs713598, rs1726866, rs10246939), TAS2R16 (rs846672), and TAS2R50 (rs1376251). Analysis of covariance was conducted to detect trends in dietary intake across TAS2R genotypes/haplotypes. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by logistic regression to test gene-adenoma risk associations. No significant associations were observed between the TAS2R38 PAV/PAV diplotype or the TAS2R16 (rs846672) polymorphism with the selected diet variables. We observed weak inverse associations between the TAS2R50 (rs1376251) C allele and dietary fiber and vegetable intake (Ps < 0.015). Odds ratios for adenoma risk were not significantly different from the null. Our findings do not support a link between these TAS2R genotypes/haplotypes and dietary intake that could impact colorectal adenoma risk. However, given the paucity of data, we cannot dismiss the possibility that these genes may influence colorectal adenoma risk in other ways, such as through impaired gastrointestinal function, particularly in subgroups of the population.

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