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Variation in Langerhans cell number and morphology between the upper and lower regions of the human esophageal epithelium.

Authors
  • Zavala, Walther D
  • De Simone, Dino Sanchez
  • Sacerdote, Fabio L
  • Cavicchia, Juan C
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Anatomical record
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2002
Volume
268
Issue
4
Pages
360–364
Identifiers
PMID: 12420283
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Langerhans cells (LCs) are dendritic components of stratified epithelia, presenting antigens to other cells of the immune system that play a crucial role in local defense. The paucity of information about their significance in the esophageal mucosa was addressed by studying their distribution and morphology in this particular location. LCs were identified by immunohistochemical detection of CD1a, a cell-specific marker, using a monoclonal antibody, as well as by electron microscopic identification of characteristic Birbeck granules, among other typical morphological features. Cell counts carried out at 25 and 35 cm distal to the dental arch demonstrated significant differences in number and size between the two locations. The upper region contained 10.4 +/- 0.8 cells (mean +/- SEM) vs. 18.4 +/- 1.4 cells in the lower region. Also, cells in the lower region were larger and appeared to have longer dendritic processes. To our knowledge this is the first report of regional differences in number and morphology of LCs in human esophageal mucosa.

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