Affordable Access

The Vancouver Lymphadenopathy-AIDS Study: 4. Effects of exposure factors, cofactors and HTLV-III seropositivity on number of helper T cells.

Authors
  • Schechter, M T
  • Boyko, W J
  • Jeffries, E
  • Willoughby, B
  • Nitz, R
  • Constance, P
  • Weaver, M
  • Wiggs, B
  • O'Shaughnessy, M
Type
Published Article
Journal
Canadian Medical Association journal
Publication Date
Aug 15, 1985
Volume
133
Issue
4
Pages
286–292
Identifiers
PMID: 2990652
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Results of testing for antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-III) and absolute numbers of helper T cells in 219 participants in the Vancouver Lymphadenopathy-AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) Study were analysed. The mean absolute helper T-cell counts in the 141 HTLV-III seronegative and the 78 seropositive men were 897/mL and 659/mL respectively (p less than 0.001). Established AIDS risk factors such as elevated lifetime number of male sexual partners and frequent receptive anal intercourse did not appear to have any significant effect on number of helper T cells that was independent of HTLV-III antibody status. Seropositive men with less than 100, 100 to 500 or more than 500 male sexual partners in their lifetime had mean absolute helper T-cell counts of 667/mL, 651/mL and 662/mL respectively. Most other risk factors, as well, did not appear to exert any effect on absolute number of helper T cells that was independent of the effect of HTLV-III antibody status. However, independent effects of a history of mononucleosis or hepatitis and of cigarette smoking were noted. The data support the hypothesis that no immune dysfunction beyond that due to the initial infection alone arises from repeated exposure to HTLV-III. Most risk factors appear to act as exposure factors, exerting their effect on the immune system merely by increasing the probability of contact with the agent. The independent effects of a history of mononucleosis or hepatitis suggest that viral agents may be cofactors in the production of immune dysfunction.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times