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Vacuum-pack temporary abdominal wound management with delayed-closure for the management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and other abdominal vascular catastrophes: absence of graft infection in long-term survivors.

Authors
  • Ross, Charles B
  • Irwin, Chance L
  • Mukherjee, Kaushik
  • Schumacher, Paul M
  • Dattilo, Jeffery B
  • Ranval, Timothy J
  • Guzman, Raul J
  • Naslund, Thomas C
Type
Published Article
Journal
The American surgeon
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2009
Volume
75
Issue
7
Identifiers
PMID: 19655599
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Patients who undergo open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA) may require delayed abdominal wound closure to prevent the adverse consequences of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. However, surgeons may be reticent to use delayed abdominal closure techniques due to concern that such management may increase the risk of graft infection. We retrospectively reviewed our patient experience with rAAA and other vascular catastrophes in which vacuum-pack abdominal wound management with delayed closure was used between 2000 and 2007. Eighteen of 23 patients treated with delayed closure survived (78%). In five early deaths, graft infection was not clinically suspected. Sixteen of 20 rAAA patients survived, with abdominal wound closure achieved at a mean of 4 days. Mean follow up was 53 months, the longest among comparable series. Graft infection has not been encountered in this group. Our results suggest that the potential risk of graft infection should not outweigh the benefits of vacuum-pack temporary abdominal wound management with delayed closure in critically ill patients at high risk for intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome after major abdominal vascular procedures.

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