Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

UV damage induces G3BP1-dependent stress granule formation that is not driven by mTOR inhibition-mediated translation arrest.

Authors
  • Ying, Shan1
  • Khaperskyy, Denys A2
  • 1 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada [email protected] , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Cell Science
Publisher
The Company of Biologists
Publication Date
Oct 28, 2020
Volume
133
Issue
20
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1242/jcs.248310
PMID: 32989041
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Translation arrest is a part of the cellular stress response that decreases energy consumption and enables rapid reprioritisation of gene expression. Often translation arrest leads to condensation of untranslated messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) into stress granules (SGs). Studies into mechanisms of SG formation and functions are complicated because various types of stress cause formation of SGs with different properties and composition. In this work, we focused on the mechanism of SG formation triggered by UV damage. We demonstrate that UV-induced inhibition of translation does not involve inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling or dissociation of the 48S preinitiation complexes. The general control non-derepressible 2 (GCN2; also known as EIF2AK4) kinase contributes to UV-induced SG formation, which is independent of the phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α. Like many other types of SGs, condensation of UV-induced granules requires the Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 (G3BP1). Our work reveals that, in UV-treated cells, the mechanisms of translation arrest and SG formation may be unlinked, resulting in SGs that do not contain the major type of polysome-free preinitiation complexes that accumulate in the cytoplasm.This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper. © 2020. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times