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Utilizing the Common-Sense model of illness representations to explore children's perceptions of, and coping with ADHD.

Authors
  • Ringer, Noam1
  • 1 Department of Education, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of mental health (Abingdon, England)
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
30
Issue
2
Pages
216–223
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09638237.2020.1714010
PMID: 32000571
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) among children is associated with difficulties in everyday functioning. According to the Common-Sense Model of Illness Representations (CSM), individuals' beliefs about their illness condition guide their attempts to cope with it. The model suggests five dimensions of illness representations: beliefs regarding the identity of the symptoms, its duration, causes, consequences, and one's ability to achieve control over it. The study aimed to explore the validity of the CSM-dimensions of illness representations for children with ADHD, while also exploring the possible relationships between types of beliefs and coping strategies. A deductive qualitative content analysis was used for analyzing data constructed from semi-structured individual interviews with 14 children diagnosed with ADHD. The results have shown that there is a variation in children's beliefs regarding their ADHD. Those beliefs are, for the most part, captured by the five CSM-dimensions. An additional dimension of 'Uniqueness' is suggested, which reflects children's beliefs on the way ADHD distinguishes them from other children. Patterns regarding types of beliefs and types of coping strategies were identified. The CSM is a useful theoretical model to understand children's beliefs of, and coping with their ADHD.

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