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Using ultraviolet light for improved antifouling performance on ship hull coatings.

Authors
  • Hunsucker, Kelli Z1
  • Braga, Cierra1
  • Gardner, Harrison1
  • Jongerius, Michel2
  • Hietbrink, Roelant3
  • Salters, Bart3
  • Swain, Geoffrey1
  • 1 a Center for Corrosion and Biofouling Control, Florida Institute of Technology , Melbourne , FL , USA.
  • 2 b Philips Research , Eindhoven , the Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 3 c Philips Intellectual Property & Standards , Eindhoven , the Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biofouling
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Aug 06, 2019
Pages
1–11
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/08927014.2019.1642334
PMID: 31385534
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

A two-part study was designed to investigate the efficacy of using UVC to prevent biofouling in the context of ship hull coatings. The first study determined the frequency of UVC required for a coating that does not have any additives (epoxy). It was found that 1 min/day was effective at preventing hard fouling but not biofilm development. The second study addressed several variables: coating type (epoxy, copper, fouling release), frequency of UVC (no exposure, continuous exposure, 1min/6h, 1 min/day), and distance from the lamp (25 and 50 mm). Continuous UVC exposure resulted in no biofouling settlement but it did damage the copper coating. Intermittent UVC exposure was effective at preventing biofouling recruitment to both the copper and the fouling release coatings. Variations were observed with regards to the fouling composition, especially biofilms, sedimentary tubeworms and barnacles, suggesting tolerances within the community.

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