Affordable Access

deepdyve-link deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Using first nations children's perceptions of food and activity to inform an obesity prevention strategy.

Authors
  • Pigford, Ashlee-Ann E
  • Willows, Noreen D
  • Holt, Nicholas L
  • Newton, Amanda S
  • Ball, Geoff D C
Type
Published Article
Journal
Qualitative Health Research
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2012
Volume
22
Issue
7
Pages
986–996
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1049732312443737
PMID: 22645224
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Obesity and associated health risks disproportionately affect Aboriginal (First Nations) children in Canada. The purpose of this research study was to elicit First Nations children's perceptions of food, activity, and health to inform a community-based obesity prevention strategy. Fifteen 4th- and 5th-Grade students participated in one of three focus group interviews that utilized drawing and pile-sorting activities. We used an ecological lens to structure our findings. Analyses revealed that a variety of interdependent sociocultural factors influenced children's perceptions. Embedded within a cultural/traditional worldview, children indicated a preference for foods and activities from both contemporary Western and traditional cultures, highlighted family members as their main sources of health information, and described information gaps in their health education. Informed by children's perspectives, these findings offer guidance for developing an obesity prevention strategy for First Nations children in this community.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times