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Using contact-based education to destigmatize opioid use disorder among medical students.

Authors
  • Mort, Sophia C1, 2
  • Díaz, Sebastián R3
  • Beverly, Elizabeth A4, 5
  • 1 Department of Medicine, Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Athens, Ohio, USA.
  • 2 The Graduate College, Translational Biomedical Sciences Program, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, USA.
  • 3 Dean's Office of Medical Education, Northeast Ohio Medical University College of Medicine, Rootstown, Ohio, USA.
  • 4 Department of Primary Care, Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Athens, Ohio, USA.
  • 5 The Diabetes Institute, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Teaching and Learning in Medicine
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2021
Volume
33
Issue
2
Pages
196–209
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/10401334.2020.1820869
PMID: 33196302
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

All first- and second-year (i.e., pre-clinical) medical students at a large, Midwestern medical school with three campuses were invited to participate in a two-arm, parallel educational study comparing the efficacy of two types of curricular interventions. Students at the main campus attended the modified contact-based education panel or the didactic lecture in person, while students at the two distance campuses attended the modified contact-based education or lecture remotely using the University's videoconferencing system. Impact: A total of 109 students participated in the study (average age 24.2 years (SD = 2.6), 64.2% female, 79.8% white, 56.0% second-year students, 67.9% attended on main campus, lecture = 52 participants, modified contact-based = 57 participants). Baseline responses were similar across groups. Following the session, participants in both interventions rated drug abuse (percent increase = 21.2%, p < .001) and prescription drug diversion (percent increase = 7.6%, p = .004) as more serious problems. Participants from both interventions expressed increased confidence in caring for patients with OUD (percent increase = 45.5%, p < .001) and increased interest in pursuing MAT training (percent increase = 21.5%, p = .04). Both curricular interventions were equally effective at reducing OUD stigma with a significant 8.2% decrease in total stigma scores and a large effect size (p < .001, ηp2 = .34). Lastly, participants with lower post-assessment OUD stigma scores were more likely to indicate that they would pursue additional training to provide MAT (p = .02). Lessons learned: Exposure to opioid-specific education with a focus on MAT and recovery, regardless of education type, positively affected opioid-related postgraduate intentions and reduced OUD stigma. Notably, these findings suggest that there are multiple efficacious techniques to reduce OUD stigma during preclinical training.

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