Affordable Access

Access to the full text

The Usefulness of Dermoscopy for the Recognition of Malignant Collision Tumors

Authors
  • Zaballos, Pedro
  • Álvarez Salafranca, Marcial
  • Medina, Carolina
  • Bañuls, José
  • Puig, Susana
  • del Pozo, Luis Javier
  • Malvehy, Josep
  • Karaarslan, Isil K.
  • Thomas, Luc
  • Landi, Christian
  • Argenziano, Giuseppe
  • Llambrich, Àlex
  • Vera, Ángel
  • Gomez-Martín, Ignacio
  • Moscarella, Elvira
  • Aviles, José Antonio
  • Martin, Jose María
  • Pizarro, Ángel
  • Flores, Gemma
Type
Published Article
Journal
Dermatology
Publisher
S. Karger AG
Publication Date
Mar 31, 2021
Volume
238
Issue
1
Pages
132–139
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1159/000514583
PMID: 33789291
Source
Karger
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Dermoscopy and Clinical Imaging – Research Article
License
Green
External links

Abstract

Background: Preoperative diagnosis of malignant collision tumors (MCT) is extremely difficult. The value of dermoscopy to improve the correct detection of these tumors has not been previously studied. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MCT with and without dermoscopy and to describe the dermoscopic features of a large series of MCT. Methods: Dermoscopic images of 161 MCT were evaluated. Clinical and dermoscopic images of histopathologically proven MCT intermingled with other tumors were randomly presented to clinicians with different levels of experience, blinded to the diagnosis and objective of the study. The clinical and dermoscopic diagnostic accuracies were measured separately. Results: A total of 161 histopathologically proven cases of MCT were collected. The most frequent MCT was basal cell carcinoma-seborrheic keratosis collision tumor (CT; 37.9%), followed by basal cell carcinoma-melanocytic nevus CT (19.9%), and melanoma-seborrheic keratosis CT (6.8%). Diagnostic accuracy among experts on dermoscopy was 71.4%. The study included 119 participants. The percentage of correct diagnoses was 8% by naked eye examination and 36.4% by dermoscopy (p < 0.001). The presence of the malignant component in the cases of MCT was not recognizable in 19.1% of cases by naked eye examination and in 11.8% of cases by dermoscopy (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The diagnosis of MCT can be assisted and clarified by dermoscopy. However, many of these lesions manifest complex morphologies and continue to be challenging, even for experts on dermoscopy. Atypical, uncertain, or non-classifiable lesions still need a complete excision for the final diagnosis.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times