Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

The use of index teeth vs. full mouth in erosive tooth wear to assess risk factors in the diet: A cross-sectional epidemiological study.

Authors
  • Martignon, Stefania1
  • López-Macías, Adriana M2
  • Bartlett, David3
  • Pitts, Nigel4
  • Usuga-Vacca, Margarita5
  • Gamboa, Luis Fernando6
  • O'Toole, Saoirse7
  • 1 UNICA - Caries Research Unit, Research Vice-rectory, Universidad El Bosque, Av. Cra. 9 No. 131A-02, Bogotá, 110121, Colombia; Centre for Oral, Clinical and Translational Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Oral & Craniofacial Sciences, King's College London Dental Institute, Floor 17, Tower Wing, Guy's Hospital, London SE1 9RT, United Kingdom. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Colombia)
  • 2 UNICA - Caries Research Unit, Research Vice-rectory, Universidad El Bosque, Av. Cra. 9 No. 131A-02, Bogotá, 110121, Colombia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Colombia)
  • 3 Centre for Oral, Clinical and Translational Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Oral & Craniofacial Sciences, King's College London Dental Institute, Floor 17, Tower Wing, Guy's Hospital, London SE1 9RT, United Kingdom. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United Kingdom)
  • 4 Centre for Oral, Clinical and Translational Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Oral & Craniofacial Sciences, King's College London Dental Institute, Floor 17, Tower Wing, Guy's Hospital, London SE1 9RT, United Kingdom. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United Kingdom)
  • 5 UNICA - Caries Research Unit, Research Vice-rectory, Universidad El Bosque, Av. Cra. 9 No. 131A-02, Bogotá, 110121, Colombia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Colombia)
  • 6 UNICA - Caries Research Unit, Research Vice-rectory, Universidad El Bosque, Av. Cra. 9 No. 131A-02, Bogotá, 110121, Colombia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Colombia)
  • 7 Centre for Oral, Clinical and Translational Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Oral & Craniofacial Sciences, King's College London Dental Institute, Floor 17, Tower Wing, Guy's Hospital, London SE1 9RT, United Kingdom. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United Kingdom)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of dentistry
Publication Date
Jul 02, 2019
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jdent.2019.07.002
PMID: 31276748
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To assess common dietary erosive-tooth-wear (ETW) risk in university students from an exotic-fruit country comparing index teeth vs. full mouth ETW assessment. A risk factors' questionnaire was applied on 601 18-25 years old subjects in Bogotá-Colombia. Trained examiners assessed clinically: ETW (BEWE) on all buccal, occlusal and lingual surfaces and ICDAS caries experience (ICDAS-DMFS). Full-arch and index-teeth (buccal of upper-central incisors and occlusal of lower-first molars) maximum-BEWE score categorized patients into: with- (2-3) and without wear (0-1). These were compared in terms of demographic, clinical, dietary and other factors with crude and logistic regression models. Students' mean age was 20.0 ± 1.9 (77.7% females). Most consumed fruits were erosive/extremely erosive (57%). Prevalence of wear was 73% (full-mouth) vs. 19.6% (index-teeth). Full-mouth-BEWE correlated significantly with teeth-index-BEWE score but low (0.31, p < 0.001). Besides anterior-teeth incisal surfaces, occlusal of lower molars (16%) and buccal of upper central incisors (3.3%) showed highest wear frequency. Straw use or 1 -h waiting for toothbrushing didn't show a protective effect. ETW was significantly associated on index teeth with frequent intakes of dietary acids (≥3 daily-acidic drinks and ≥4 daily-fruit portions) (single-variable-logistic regression: OR 4.41, p = 0.22 and OR 1.60, p = 0.035; multivariable-logistic regression: OR 4.47, p = 0.022 and OR 1.63, p = 0.036 respectively). No significant differences were noticed between groups when the full-mouth maximum score was used. This young cohort showed dietary ETW associated with frequent dietary acids' intakes and grading ETW on index teeth vs. full mouth was a more sensitive measurement method to assess underlying ETW risk factors. The teeth index has promising usefulness for the clinic and epidemiology. Using index teeth (buccal of upper central incisors and occlusal of lower first molars) for ETW (BEWE) assessment allowed to show association in young adults between frequent daily exotic fruits/fruit juices dietary-acid consumption and ETW, representing a less time consuming clinical/epidemiological method of ETW measurement than a full mouth examination. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times