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Use of a helmet for oxygen therapy in critically ill patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Authors
  • Wang, Tao1
  • Yin, Hongzhen1
  • Xu, Qiancheng1
  • Jiang, Xiaogan1
  • Yu, Tao2
  • 1 Department of Critical Care Medicine, Research Center for Functional Maintenance and Reconstruction of Viscera, Wannan Medical College First Affiliated Hospital, Yijishan Hospital, Wuhu, China
  • 2 l, Wuhu, China
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of International Medical Research
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Mar 25, 2020
Volume
48
Issue
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0300060520903209
PMID: 32212877
PMCID: PMC7254593
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Objective This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy of using a helmet for oxygen therapy in critically ill patients with respiratory failure. Methods The Cochrane Library, Embase, and PubMed databases were searched for all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the efficacy of a helmet versus standard oxygen therapy or a mask in critically ill patients with respiratory failure. The quality of all included studies was evaluated by the method recommended by The Cochrane Collaboration. The systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager software, version 5.3 (Nordic Cochrane Centre, The Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, Denmark). Results Ten RCTs involving 708 patients were included in the present meta-analysis. The results of the meta-analysis showed that the oxygenation index, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and complications were not significantly different between the helmet group and the standard oxygen therapy or mask group. The incidence of intubation and the mortality rate were significantly lower in the helmet group than in the standard oxygen therapy or mask group. Conclusion Delivering oxygen via a helmet can decrease the incidence of required intubation and improve the mortality rate, resulting in beneficial outcomes in critically ill patients with respiratory failure.

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