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Use of aptamer tagging to identify in vivo protein binding partners of small regulatory RNAs.

Authors
  • 1
  • 1 Institute for Molecular Infection Biology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
1940-6029
Publication Date
Volume
905
Pages
177–200
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/978-1-61779-949-5_11
PMID: 22736004
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are short, generally noncoding RNAs that act posttranscriptionally to control target gene expression. Over the past 10 years there has been a rapid expansion in the discovery and characterization of sRNAs in a diverse range of bacteria. Paradigm shifts in our understanding of the breadth of posttranscriptional control by sRNAs were achieved in a number of pioneering studies that involved immunoprecipitation of a known RNA chaperone, the near-ubiquitous Hfq, followed by sequencing to identify novel putative regulators and targets. To perform the converse experiment, we previously developed a method which uses an aptamer-tagged sRNA to allow purification of in vivo assembled RNA-protein complexes and subsequent identification of bound proteins. We successfully implemented this protocol using the Hfq-associated sRNA, InvR, tagged with a tandem repeat of the commonly used MS2-aptamer. Incorporation of the aptamer had no effect on sRNA stability or activity. InvR-MS2 could be effectively purified along with associated proteins, such as Hfq, using maltose binding protein fused to the MS2 coat protein (MBP-MS2) immobilized on an amylose column. Mass-spectroscopy was also used to identify previously uncharacterized protein partners. These results have been described previously (Said et al., Nucleic Acids Res 37:e133, 2009) and thus the figures presented here are intended solely as an illustrative guide to complement this detailed step-by-step protocol.

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