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Urinary S-100B concentrations in term and preterm infants at risk for brain damage.

Authors
  • Ruetzler, Katharina1
  • Bührer, Christoph
  • Grimmer, Ingrid
  • Müller, Christian
  • Nagdyman, Nicole
  • Obladen, Michael
  • 1 Department of Neonatology, Charité Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin, Germany. [email protected] , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biology of the neonate
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2006
Volume
89
Issue
4
Pages
260–264
Identifiers
PMID: 16340181
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Elevated serum concentrations of S-100B, a 21-kDa protein expressed in astroglial cells, has been used to assess cerebral damage after head trauma, infection, ischemia, and perinatal asphyxia. As S-100B is eliminated by the kidneys, we investigated the feasibility of measuring S-100B in urine of newborns with severe perinatal asphyxia, and in very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants at risk for neurodevelopmental impairment. We first analyzed urine samples of 8 term or near-term newborns without major medical problems, followed by urine samples of 2 term newborns with severe birth asphyxia, and finally urine samples of 8 VLBW (gestational age 24-28 weeks) infants collected every 4 h for up to 10 days. Urinary S-100B concentrations in 8 term or near-term newborns without major medical problems were consistently <1 microg/l. In 2 term newborns with severe asphyxia (Apgar 0/0/0 and 0/2/4) who subsequently had widespread cerebral damage on magnetic resonance imaging, peak urinary S-100B concentrations on the first day of life were 28.1 and 28.4 microg/l, respectively. In 5/8 VLBW infants, urinary S-100B was> microg/l in samples obtained on the first day of life (range 1.2-44.9 microg/l, median 6.8 microg/l). Peak S-100B in urine samples collected during the first 12 h of life were negatively related to gestational age (R(s)=-0.882, p=0.009). Three of the 8 preterm infants had peak urinary concentrations>0 microg/l but neither ultrasound signs of brain damage nor neurodevelopmental delay at 1 year corrected age. The determination of urinary S-100B concentrations might be helpful in term infants with severe asphyxia, while high urinary S-100B concentrations in preterm infants are to be attributed to immaturity. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

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