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Uptake of the HPV vaccine among people with and without HIV, cisgender and transgender women and men who have sex with men and with women at two sexual health clinics in Mexico City.

Authors
  • Allen-Leigh, Betania1
  • Rivera-Rivera, Leonor1
  • Yunes-Díaz, Elsa2
  • Portillo-Romero, Alejandra Jalil3
  • Brown, Brandon4
  • León-Maldonado, Leith5, 6
  • Vargas-Guadarrama, Galileo7
  • Salmerón, Jorge6
  • Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo Cesar2
  • 1 Reproductive Health Division, Center for Population Health Research, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. , (Mexico)
  • 2 Center for Population Health Research, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. , (Mexico)
  • 3 Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. , (Mexico)
  • 4 School of Medicine, University of California at Riverside, Riverside, California, USA.
  • 5 Cátedra CONACYT-Center for Population Health Research, National Institute of Public Health, Mexico City, Mexico. , (Mexico)
  • 6 Academic Unit in Epidemiological Research. Center for Research in Policies, Population, and Health, School of Medicine, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico. , (Mexico)
  • 7 Center for the Prevention and Comprehensive Care of HIV/AIDS in Mexico City, Condesa Clinic, Mexico City, Mexico. , (Mexico)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2019
Pages
1–10
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/21645515.2019.1675456
PMID: 31657665
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Our aim was to better understand Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance among Mexican adults including people with and without HIV, cisgender men who have sex with men (MSM) or with women (MSW), cisgender and transgender women. A computer-assisted, self-administered questionnaire was completed by healthcare users and participants recruited through community organizations, and the first dose of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was offered at no cost at a large sexual health clinic in Mexico City, from May to December 2018. Socio-demographic characteristics and factors associated with HPV vaccine acceptance were analyzed using logistic regression.The sample of 1915 participants included 1341 cisgender men (70.9%, 1247 MSM and 94 MSW), 396 (20.7%) cisgender women and 178 (9.3%) transwomen; 615 people (32.1%) were HIV positive. Uptake of the HPV vaccine was higher in men and transwomen (91.5% and 87%, respectively) than among cisgender women (81.8%; p < .001). Cisgender women (OR 0.43, 95%CI 0.30-0.61, p < .05) were less likely to accept HPV vaccination than men. Married/partnered people were less likely to accept HPV vaccination compared to those who were single (OR 0.70, 95%CI 0.51-0.97). People living with HIV were not significantly more likely to accept HPV vaccination (OR 1.7; 95%CI 0.86-1.61).HPV vaccine acceptance was high among adult Mexican study participants; it may be higher than among other Mexican adults given most of these individuals are engaged in care. Modifications will be needed in national and international recommendations on HPV vaccination in adults if healthcare personnel are to recommend the vaccine to the population groups studied.

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