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Uptake of (6,7-3H)estradiol-17beta in ovariectomized rats, guinea pigs, and hamsters: correlation with species differences in behavioral responsiveness to estradiol.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Brain Research
0006-8993
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
71
Issue
1
Pages
93–103
Identifiers
PMID: 4856610
Source
Medline
Keywords
  • Animals, Laboratory
  • Behavior
  • Biology
  • Clinical Research
  • Contraception
  • Contraceptive Agents, Estrogen--Administraction And Dosage
  • Contraceptive Agents, Estrogen--Side Effects
  • Contraceptive Agents, Female--Administraction And Dosage
  • Contraceptive Agents, Female--Side Effects
  • Contraceptive Agents--Administraction And Dosage
  • Contraceptive Agents--Side Effects
  • Endocrine System
  • Estradiol Benzoate--Administraction And Dosage
  • Estradiol Benzoate--Side Effects
  • Estradiol--Administraction And Dosage
  • Estradiol--Side Effects
  • Estrogens
  • Examinations And Diagnoses
  • Family Planning
  • Female Sterilization--Side Effects
  • Gynecologic Surgery
  • Hormone Receptors
  • Hormones
  • Laboratory Examinations And Diagnoses
  • Laboratory Procedures
  • Membrane Proteins
  • Ovariectomy--Side Effects
  • Physiology
  • Progestational Hormones
  • Progesterone--Administraction And Dosage
  • Progesterone--Side Effects
  • Research Methodology
  • Sex Behavior
  • Sterilization, Sexual
  • Surgery
  • Treatment
  • Urogenital Surgery

Abstract

The amount of estradiol benzoate with progesterone required to induce lordosis in ovariectomized hamsters was determined to compare the responsiveness of hamsters to estradiol benzoate with that of rats and guinea pigs. In addition, the uptake and metabolism of tritiated estradiol in ovariectomized rats, guinea pigs, and hamsters was examined in an attempt to correlate species differences in behavioral sensitivity to estradiol with possible differences in neural affinity for the steroid. A dose of nearly 90 mg/kg was required to induce lordosis in 100% of the hamsters compared with the 2-5 mcg/kg which is effective in rats and guinea pigs. In all 3 species, highest uptake of estradiol was in the uterus and anterior pituitary gland. In the rat and guinea pig brains, the hypothalamus took up more estradiol than either the cortex or midbrain. In the hamster, there were no consistent differences in brain uptake. The affinity of the uterus, anterior pituitary, and hypothalamus of rats and guinea pigs for estradiol was greater than that of hamsters. In all 3 species, estrone was the principal metabolite of estradiol found in the tissues. The authors suggest that the higher the endogenous levels of a steroid, the less sensitive the animal is to that steroid.

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