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Updated Assessment of Colorectal Cancer Incidence in the U.S. by Age, Sex, and Race/Ethnicity.

Authors
  • Ohri, Ajay1
  • Robinson, Ann1
  • Liu, Benny2
  • Bhuket, Taft2
  • Wong, Robert3
  • 1 Department of Internal Medicine, Alameda Health System - Highland Hospital, Oakland, CA, USA.
  • 2 Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Endoscopy Unit, Alameda Health System - Highland Hospital Campus, 1411 East 31st Street, Highland Hospital - Highland Care Pavilion 5th Floor, Oakland, CA, 94602, USA.
  • 3 Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Endoscopy Unit, Alameda Health System - Highland Hospital Campus, 1411 East 31st Street, Highland Hospital - Highland Care Pavilion 5th Floor, Oakland, CA, 94602, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Digestive Diseases and Sciences
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2020
Volume
65
Issue
6
Pages
1838–1849
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10620-019-05913-y
PMID: 31701261
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Whether recent updates to colon cancer screening guidelines benefit men and women or all race/ethnic groups equally is not clear. The aim of this study is to evaluate age-, sex-, and race/ethnicity-specific trends in CRC incidence and disease burden among adults. Using 2000-2014 surveillance, epidemiology, and end results database, annual CRC incidence (per 100,000 persons/year) among U.S. adults was categorized by age (using 10-year age intervals) and stratified by sex and race/ethnicity. Comparison of incidence between groups utilized the z-statistic with p < 0.05 indicating statistical significance. Overall, CRC incidence was the highest among patients aged ≥ 80 years (330.8 per 100,000 persons/year), which was significantly higher in men versus women (377.2 vs. 304.3 per 100,000 persons/year, p < 0.001). CRC incidence in younger individuals was 22.8 per 100,000 persons/year (age 40-49) and 6.8 per 100,000 persons/year (age 30-39). CRC incidence was significantly higher in African Americans compared to non-Hispanic whites. From 2000 to 2014, CRC incidence declined in all age groups over age 60, remained stable in age 50-59, and demonstrated proportional increases in among age 20-49 years. While CRC incidence in all race/ethnic groups aged ≥ 60 years declined, Hispanics aged 50-59 increased 21.9%, but remained stable in other race/ethnic groups. Race/ethnicity-specific disparities in CRC incidence in patients aged 20-49 were also observed. While CRC incidence has declined among U.S. adults aged ≥ 60, increasing incidence among patients aged < 50 is concerning. Identifying risk factors among "average-risk" patients is needed to better implement targeted screening of individuals not currently meeting CRC screening criteria.

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