Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Untuned suppression makes a major contribution to the enhancement of orientation selectivity in macaque v1.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Neuroscience
0270-6474
Publisher
Society for Neuroscience
Publication Date
Volume
31
Issue
44
Pages
15972–15982
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2245-11.2011
PMID: 22049440
Source
Medline

Abstract

One of the functions of the cerebral cortex is to increase the selectivity for stimulus features. Finding more about the mechanisms of increased cortical selectivity is important for understanding how the cortex works. Up to now, studies in multiple cortical areas have reported that suppressive mechanisms are involved in feature selectivity. However, the magnitude of the contribution of suppression to tuning selectivity is not yet determined. We use orientation selectivity in macaque primary visual cortex, V1, as an archetypal example of cortical feature selectivity and develop a method to estimate the magnitude of the contribution of suppression to orientation selectivity. The results show that untuned suppression, one form of cortical suppression, decreases the orthogonal-to-preferred response ratio (O/P ratio) of V1 cells from an average of 0.38 to 0.26. Untuned suppression has an especially large effect on orientation selectivity for highly selective cells (O/P < 0.2). Therefore, untuned suppression is crucial for the generation of highly orientation-selective cells in V1 cortex.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments
F