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The unforeseen intracellular lifestyle of Enterococcus faecalis in hepatocytes.

Authors
  • Nunez, Natalia1
  • Derré-Bobillot, Aurélie1
  • Trainel, Nicolas2
  • Lakisic, Goran1
  • Lecomte, Alexandre1
  • Mercier-Nomé, Françoise3
  • Cassard, Anne-Marie2
  • Bierne, Hélène1
  • Serror, Pascale1
  • Archambaud, Cristel1
  • 1 Université -Saclay, Inrae, AgroParisTech, Micalis Institute, Jouy-en-Josas, France. , (France)
  • 2 Université Paris-Saclay, Inserm U996, Inflammation, Microbiome and Immunosurveillance, Clamart, France. , (France)
  • 3 Université Paris-Saclay, INSERM, CNRS, Institut Paris Saclay d'Innovation Thérapeutique, Châtenay-Malabry, France. , (France)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Gut Microbes
Publisher
Landes Bioscience
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2022
Volume
14
Issue
1
Pages
2058851–2058851
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/19490976.2022.2058851
PMID: 35373699
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Enterococcus faecalis is a bacterial species present at a subdominant level in the human gut microbiota. This commensal turns into an opportunistic pathogen under specific conditions involving dysbiosis and host immune deficiency. E. faecalis is one of the rare pathobionts identified to date as contributing to liver damage in alcoholic liver disease. We have previously observed that E. faecalis is internalized in hepatocytes. Here, the survival and fate of E. faecalis was examined in hepatocytes, the main epithelial cell type in the liver. Although referred to as an extracellular pathogen, we demonstrate that E. faecalis is able to survive and divide in hepatocytes, and form intracellular clusters in two distinct hepatocyte cell lines, in primary mouse hepatocytes, as well as in vivo. This novel process extends to kidney cells. Unraveling the intracellular lifestyle of E. faecalis, our findings contribute to the understanding of pathobiont-driven diseases.

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