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Undetectable ultrasensitive PSA after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer predicts relapse-free survival.

Authors
  • Doherty, A P
  • Bower, M
  • Smith, G L
  • Miano, R
  • Mannion, E M
  • Mitchell, H
  • Christmas, T J
Type
Published Article
Journal
British journal of cancer
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2000
Volume
83
Issue
11
Pages
1432–1436
Identifiers
PMID: 11076649
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Radical retropubic prostatectomy is considered by many centres to be the treatment of choice for men aged less than 70 years with localized prostate cancer. A rise in serum prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy occurs in 10-40% of cases. This study evaluates the usefulness of novel ultrasensitive PSA assays in the early detection of biochemical relapse. 200 patients of mean age 61. 2 years underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy. Levels < or = 0.01 ng ml-1 were considered undetectable. Mean pre-operative prostate-specific antigen was 13.3 ng ml-1. Biochemical relapse was defined as 3 consecutive rises. The 2-year biochemical disease-free survival for the 134 patients with evaluable prostate-specific antigen nadir data was 61.1% (95% CI: 51.6-70.6%). Only 2 patients with an undetectable prostate-specific antigen after radical retropubic prostatectomy biochemically relapsed (3%), compared to 47 relapses out of 61 patients (75%) who did not reach this level. Cox multivariate analysis confirms prostate-specific antigen nadir < or = 0.01 ng ml-1 to be a superb independent variable predicting a favourable biochemical disease-free survival (P < 0.0001). Early diagnosis of biochemical relapse is feasible with sensitive prostate-specific antigen assays. These assays more accurately measure the prostate-specific antigen nadir, which is an excellent predictor of biochemical disease-free survival. Thus, sensitive prostate-specific antigen assays offer accurate prognostic information and expedite decision-making regarding the use of salvage prostate-bed radiotherapy or hormone therapy.

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