Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Understanding the challenges faced by Michigan's family farmers: race/ethnicity and the impacts of a pandemic.

Authors
  • Taylor, Dorceta E1
  • Farias, Lina M2
  • Kahan, Lia M3
  • Talamo, Julia1
  • Surdoval, Alison4
  • McCoy, Ember D5
  • Daupan, Socorro M6
  • 1 School of the Environment, Yale University, 195 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511 USA.
  • 2 14 E Cache La Poudre St, Colorado Springs, CO 80903 USA.
  • 3 The College of Wooster, 1189 Beall Ave, Wooster, OH 44691 USA.
  • 4 The Nature Conservancy, 4245 North Fairfax Drive, #100, Arlington, VA 22203 USA.
  • 5 School for the Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan, 440 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA.
  • 6 Clean Water Action, 1315 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, 19107 USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Agriculture and human values
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2022
Volume
39
Issue
3
Pages
1077–1096
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10460-022-10305-6
PMID: 35261437
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Michigan is a critical agricultural state, and small family farms are a crucial component of the state's food sector. This paper examines how the race/ethnicity of the family farm owners/operators is related to farm characteristics, financing, and impacts of the pandemic. It compares 75 farms owned/operated solely by Whites and 15 with People of Color owners/operators. The essay examines how farmers finance their farm operations and the challenges they face doing so. The article also explores how the Coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) pandemic affected farming operations, the financial viability of farms, and how farmers responded to the challenges posed by the pandemic. The study found that People of Color farm owners/operators were younger than White farm owners/operators. The People of Color farm owners/operators tended to manage smaller farms for shorter periods than White farm owners/operators. Though two-thirds of the Farmers of Color owned their farms, they were more financially vulnerable than White farm owners/operators. The farmers studied had difficulty obtaining loans to finance their farms. Farmers reported increasing requests from people for food assistance during the pandemic. Farmers responded to the pandemic by participating in government programs such as the Farm to Families Food Box Program that purchased their produce. It allowed farmers to supply emergency food assistance programs with products from their farms. The products went to families receiving food assistance from soup kitchens, food banks, and other community-based nonprofits. © The Author(s) 2022.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times